Meeting Recap 4/20/2017
#1
This has been well overdue so I think I should get to it haha. I had planned to give a lecture at this meeting but we decided to cram a bunch of stuff in as well. Our advisor was able to attend this meeting and we also had a few new faces as well. So for the first half of the meeting I ran through the slides for the meeting on 4/13 and you can find the recap for that meeting here. We introduced ourselves so Ben (our advisor) could get to know us a bit, and he talked about himself and his experiences and why he's the perfect fit to be our advisor. After that I did go ahead and give my mini lecture which was an introduction to networks. Rather than try and write up that lecture in a long post I'm just going to attach the power point so anyone who missed it can see it for themselves. If you have any questions about the topics on the slides or related topics please ask! I'll be setting up a thread in the Learning and Resources section specifically for people who want to ask questions or learn about things which you can find here.

That was about all there was to that meeting.


Attached Files
.pptx   Intro to Networking.pptx (Size: 23.24 MB / Downloads: 38)
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#2
I have a question about something mentioned in the slide deck. On slide 24, you say that "The subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 on the address range of 123.456.0.0 would split the network up into 255 more networks of 255 address each." Wouldn't having a /24 on 123.456.0.0 just use the address range of 123.456.0.0-123.456.0.255? It is a separate definition for a subnet outside of that /24 range, so if 123.456.2.0 was the desired subnet, that would have to be specified? Or am I just misinterpreting the slides?

Also, 123.456.0.0 is class A, not B.
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#3
(09-28-2017, 08:59 AM)zwork Wrote: I have a question about something mentioned in the slide deck. On slide 24, you say that "The subnet mask of 255.255.255.0 on the address range of 123.456.0.0 would split the network up into 255 more networks of 255 address each." Wouldn't having a /24 on 123.456.0.0 just use the address range of 123.456.0.0-123.456.0.255? It is a separate definition for a subnet outside of that /24 range, so if 123.456.2.0 was the desired subnet, that would have to be specified? Or am I just misinterpreting the slides?

Also, 123.456.0.0 is class A, not B.

There is very likely a typo in that presentation. I'll take a closer look this weekend and see whats going on. I wrote a lot of the slides for last term in a hurry so typos happened somewhat often.
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#4
I looked back through the notes and there's no typo. In that example I was using a hypothetical class B network of 123.456.0.0 which is not actually a valid network, just an example. The idea is that if it were a real network segment then using a /24 netmask would allow for 255 subnets of 123.456.1.0 through 123.456.255.0 and each of those subnets would have 254 assignable address like 123.456.8.14 or 123.456.205.103 and so on.
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#5
(09-29-2017, 02:06 AM)ITZach Wrote: I looked back through the notes and there's no typo. In that example I was using a hypothetical class B network of 123.456.0.0 which is not actually a valid network, just an example. The idea is that if it were a real network segment then using a /24 netmask would allow for 255 subnets of 123.456.1.0 through 123.456.255.0 and each of those subnets would have 254 assignable address like 123.456.8.14 or 123.456.205.103 and so on.

Ok, thank you.
Passionate about Cisco, Linux & ESXi

My lab: http://corvallisitclub.com/showthread.php?tid=61
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